“Global food price shocks have demonstrated the urgent need to effectively address food insecurity in Southeast Asia – both at the national and regional level”

This think-piece goes beyond issues of supply and demand of food, and provides greater insight to the role of Human Security in understanding the issue of food security in a holistic manner. Click here to read the article.

 

Photo by George Reyes @ Flickr.

“The over-reliance on the government for solutions, however, reflects what some have termed as the nanny-state syndrome: due to years of strong state intervention and action, people have become apathetic and expect the government to address all problems.”

Read more about addressing climate change in Singapore in this article in Asia Dialogue, the online magazine of the University of Nottingham Asia Research Institute.

 

Photo by yeowatzupPublic Housing, Dover, Singapore, CC BY 2.0, Link 

In a think piece “Ensuring Good Health During the Hajj in a Time of the H1N1 Pandemic”, I  – together with researchers at the RSIS Centre for NTS Studies – commented on the progress and prospects of H1N1 pandemic mitigation efforts in Saudi Arabia leading up to the annual Hajj pilgrimage in 2009.

The piece noted that despite the complex circumstances surrounding pandemic preparedness during the Hajj, successful mitigation of a pandemic spread is possible with efficient multi-sectoral cooperation amongst Hajj officials and pilgrims. Such efforts must also be given greater emphasis in the media so as to ensure accurate and holistic reporting of events thereby reduce the likelihood of media hypes of a pandemic outbreak.

To read the article, click here.

On 13 May 2011, I was featured in Singapore’s Malay Newspaper – Berita Harian – for my research and advocacy work on faith-based environmentalism.

In the interview, I noted how countries in the Muslim World largely fall into at least one of three categories in relation to climate change.

  1. Victims of climate change: Countries such as Bangladesh and Indonesia face rising sea levels and flooding, while sub-saharan Africa face drought.
  2. Contributors of climate change: Oil-rich Gulf Arab states have one of the highest carbon emissions per capita in the world, while the rate of deforestation in Indonesia makes its total carbon emissions to be just behind the US and China.
  3. Solutions to address climate change: Despite the bleak scenario, there are still opportunities for countries in the Muslim world to play a more active role in addressing environmental challenges. Resource rich Muslim countries ought to better strategise how they can invest in technology and other solutions. More effort would be needed for forest rich countries like Indonesia to preserve and rehabilitate their forests which act as “carbon sinks”.

In addition, all Muslims can do their part by taking inspiration and guidance from their faith. Despite the wealth of Islamic knowledge on nature and the environment, little has been done by Muslims to operationalise these principles. In this regard, further community action is needed.

My two cents worth on the pitfalls of riding on Crazy Rich Asians wave for promoting tourism in Singapore.

One of the broader impacts that my colleague, Luenne, and I mentioned in the article is the ramifications that it potentially has for the average middle-class Chinese. This is particularly so in places where Chinese are a minority community and have faced discrimination due to the stereotype of being “crazy rich”.

Running through my Facebook feed today, a Chinese-Indonesian friend had this to say about  the movie.

“Crazy Rich Asian –> a stereotypical, rather than representative image of Asia. Therefore, it is a dangerous movie.”

We were spot on.

To read the article  published on 17th Sept 2018 in Today (Singapore), click here.

 

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Up before sunrise on a public holiday. WHUT?!

Cos sometimes you just gotta get things done. Fajr prayers, intercontinental skype calls, reports and thesis.

But first, a wholemeal toast with a spread of almond butter and fresh fig. Yes fresh fig. Ditch the jam and have the real thing when you can.

Cuppa coffee and Mano Chao to keep me company too.

Enjoy! 🙂

When I saw this video (below), I was like “Dayummmmm..” I mean what’s a party without a bowl of Doritos? That convenient [read: LAZY] option to just grab from the store to entertain guests or bring to a pot luck gathering.

The solution: Just gotta be a bit more creative and try healthier options then… like good ol’ carrot and celery sticks and dips. Or altenative corn chips that don’t have a bad rep (but probably cost a little more).

It’s funny how many of us would say we’re environmentally-conscious, but as we dig deeper and deeper, we realise that there’s a lot more to be done. Our consumption patterns more than we think.

It sure isn’t going happen over night. Doritos will still be a permanent feature in many parties. But with greater awareness, people can make better choices, inshaAllah. In any case, for me personally, its just another reason for me to stop eating junk.

To sign the petition against Doritos’ parent company PepsiCo from destroying the planet, click here.

If you want change, you have to be the change. Do it.

image SO…. after a long hiatus of being “in the field” and just trying to make sense of what all that data means for my PhD thesis, I’ve decided to resume blogging.  And what better to kick it off again with food! Tonight’s dinner was a random concoction of blues and greens. Chicken salad with blue cheese and blueberries on a bed of greens and a side of green tea. 🙂 FAQ: So how’s your thesis going? Ans: Better than last year. Thanks.

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Ever had one of those weeks where you’re supercharged in the first half of the week then lose steam on the last few days?

This was one of them.  Started the week totally stoked (and extra early) for a 10-12 chat on air with Genevieve Jacobs of ABC Canberra about religion and climate change. Early mornings and a good level of productivity till mid-week (including a trip to the national library and a discussion on the health impacts of climate change), after which it went down hill. I partially blame the falling temperatures in the mornings that keep me in bed rather than jumping out of bed.

Anyway, here’s to a VERY late Saturday brunch. Beans, spinach and eggs on a sourdough toast. Jemput!  🙂